Project Eden Review


In the not too distant future, the Earth has become severely overpopulated.  In order to accommodate the masses, cities are growing increasingly taller.  In the towering cities, the rich and powerful live at the upper levels which still receive light, while conditions decline rapidly the further you descend into the depths of the cities.  The responsibility of keeping the order in this brave new world falls to the UPA (Urban Protection Agency).  Your team of UPA operatives are called upon to investigate the strange goings-on at the Real Meat factory.  Seems that equipment is malfunctioning and every technician sent in to investigate disappears...

Your team has four members, each of which has a different skill set.  Carter is the commander and knows how to get information from people and to interface with command and control.  Next is Minoka, the team hacker who can use computer terminals to gain access to data or computer controlled equipment.  Andre is the team engineer and can repair broken mechanical and electrical systems.  Finally, there is Amber, a robotic cyborg who can operate in hazardous environments.  In addition to your team members, you'll have access to robotic controlled tools: the rover and the flycam.  Each of these can be used to access and scout areas inaccessible to your team.

As the game progresses, you'll be given a series of objectives to complete as you investigate the problems at the Real Meat factory.  Accomplishing these objectives invariably requires exploration, puzzle-solving, and some combat with the various nasties hiding in the factory.  This may make you wonder whether Project Eden is an action or adventure game - the answer is a little of both, but if you had to pick one, it is primarily an adventure game.

The puzzles in Project Eden are of the environment-based variety and will require you to use your team members' special skills.  For example, you might need Minoka to use a computer to give Amber access to an area filled with poison gasses.  Amber can then clear the area of the gasses to allow Andre in to repair a broken door control.  These puzzles are generally well-designed, and their solutions are not always obvious, which leaves the player with a feeling of accomplishment after solving them.