Seven Kingdoms: Conquest Review


Stop me if youíve think that youíve heard this one before. Generic strategy game with graphics that look at least five years old and featuring campaigns that are one ďbuild a large army and wipe out the enemyís baseĒ mission after another. Enemy AI that sends random small patrols to your base to be slaughtered. Troops that are slightly harder to get a across the map than a legion of cats. Random crashes that take you to the desktop if youíre lucky, and force you to reboot if youíre not. Sound familiar? Unfortunately Iíve just described an innumerable number of strategy games that Iíve had the misfortune of having played as part of my responsibilities as a game reviewer. In this particular case, the game happens to be Seven Kingdoms: Conquest, but if I took the time to write a long, multi-page review I would just be taking a long time to tell you what Iíve already stated in this opening paragraph. There have been plenty of innovations in strategy gaming since the original Age of Empires was released, but yet again we have an Age of Empires clone that canít even get the basic formula right. Thereís no reason for me to take the time to tell you more about the game, because nothing that I donít mention here will make the game worth your time. Even if you were given the game as a gift and didnít have to pay for it, Iíd recommend not bothering with it; there are just too many games out there that are more deserving of your time.

In The End, This Game Hath Been Rated: 30%. Seven Kingdoms: Conquest is indistinguishable from any other bad strategy game you've played over the past ten years.