PRISM: Light the Way Review


Prism: Light the Way would more appropriately subtitled "Light Them Up". That's because your goal is to provide life-sustaining light to creatures called glowbos who've made the unfortunate and tragic decision to live in a cave. Rescue comes in the form of bulboids, creatures that shoot a strong and steady beam of light out of the top of their heads. Unfortunately they can only shoot that beam in one direction. Your job is to use mirrors, crystals, and beam-splitters to direct the light to the glowbos before they die.

Each of the game's levels is set up as a grid with the glowbos appearing on the edges. Within the grid appear one or more bulboids and a limited set of beam-directing objects such as the aforementioned angled mirrors. Using the stylus you'll have to drag the bulboids and the objects to the right positions so that every bulboid around the puzzle is bathed in a stream of light. It sounds simple and at first it is. Too simple in fact. But before you quit out of boredom you should keep at it because the puzzles slowly but surely ramp up in difficulty. The solutions will no longer be blatantly obvious and you'll be challenged to get that light where it needs to be.

For those of you who like to work under pressure, the game has two additional modes that you should find appealing. There is a timed mode in which you're given a time limit for each puzzle. If you beat the puzzle time then the remaining time will be added as a bonus to the timer for the next puzzle. If that's still not enough for you, the game's hyper mode should take care of you. In this mode the glowbos will explode if you don't get them light in time. Before too long the glowbos start appearing quickly and in large numbers, forcing you to really push things around quickly with your stylus. Things can actually get a bit stressful, so if you play puzzles to relax you'll want to avoid this mode.

Prism is certainly different than other puzzle games out there, which is nice to see considering all of the cloning that goes on in the genre. It would have been nice if the game had divided its puzzles by difficulty rather than making you play through so many no-brainers at the start, but this is a small complaint. However, Prism just seems to be missing that indescribable something that makes a puzzle game addicting. You'll play for a little and then be ready to put it down for a bit, and it won't consume your thoughts between sessions. I know some people need that addiction factor to keep playing a puzzle game, so Prism won't appeal to everyone. If you're the type that likes puzzles that require a fair amount of brainpower, though, it's certainly worth your time to give it a try.

In The End, This Game Hath Been Rated: 75%. Prism is a bright spot of originality in a genre infamous for being filled with one knock-off after another.